Mon. Jun 27th, 2022

TUBE station is closed today due to strike action. This means travel chaos for those returning to work after a bank holiday break.

The London Underground has warned people not to travel, warning of severe disruption across its network from the start of service on Monday until 8 a.m. Tuesday.

Members of the Railway, Shipping, and Transport (RMT) union are fighting over disputes over jobs and pensions.

Transport for London (TfL) said some train services are operating, but many stations, particularly those in central and south London, will be closed and others will only be open for a limited time.

Other TfL services including DLR, London Overground and Trams will operate unaffected by industrial action but will be busier.

The TfL said no pensions or conditions were offered and no one would lose their jobs as a result of the proposed offer.

As part of a previous financing agreement, the government required the TfL to strive to achieve financial sustainability for its operations by April 2023.

Read the Tube Strike Live blog below for the latest updates…

  • Good for walking and biking.

    Londoners are no more than 600 meters from the Santander cycle rental point in the heart of the capital.

    Meanwhile, Brompton Bike Hire offers free bike rentals at docks across London.

    Much of Zone 1 is walkable and people are encouraged to walk or bike if possible.

    A walking and biking map of the West End and City of London can be downloaded from the TfL website.

  • Advice on traveling to Heathrow Airport

    London Underground strike means most routes to Heathrow Airport will be closed.

    Passengers traveling to Heathrow are encouraged to use the TfL rail service instead of the Piccadilly route whenever possible.

  • electric scooter use

    In light of Tube Strike, there are other methods you can use to travel around London.

    In some boroughs, you can rent an electric scooter, which is the only legal way to ride in London.

    These areas are Camden, City of London, Ealing, Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea, Lambeth, Richmond on Thames, Southwark, Tower Hamlets and Westminster.

  • The party for millions of Jubilee Bank Holiday revelers is over.

    The party for the millions of people attending the Platinum Jubilee event over the extended bank holiday weekend is over.

    After four days of glitzy and extravagant partying, the queen still said, “I will devote myself to serving the country to the best of my ability to the best of my ability.”

    The 96-year-old monarch appeared in person for over 27 minutes over the weekend, absent from many celebrations.

    Delighting the thousands of people who filled the mall, the Queen stepped out onto her balcony on Sunday evening after the Platinum Competition, which presented a bizarre, fun and imaginative carnival-like exhibit telling the story of her life and country.

    Next to her were three heirs (son, grandson and great-grandson), giving her a glimpse into the future of the royal family.

  • Londoners share the misfortune as the strike brings chaos to the capital.

    A 24-hour strike hit the London Underground network this morning and the action is expected to go on until 8am on Tuesday.

    And Londoners are complaining on social media.

    As one disgruntled traveler said, “The subway strike makes me realize that I took my commute for granted.”

    Meanwhile, another said, “I got stuck on a bus on a very humid morning in London because of a subway strike. It’s fun.”

  • TfL said it had no proposals for a pension.

    The TfL said no pensions or conditions were offered and no one would lose their jobs as a result of the proposed offer.

    As part of a previous financing agreement, the government required the TfL to strive to achieve financial sustainability for its operations by April 2023.

    TfL has suggested not to recruit about 500-600 posts once a vacancy becomes available.

  • London Underground ‘toxic’ strike

    Commuters have complained about the ‘toxic’ strike action on the London Underground as they face long delays.

    They used Twitter to describe buses crawling along with increasing traffic jams on the roads.

    One person wrote: “With heavy traffic, today won’t last long already.”

    Another netizen commented, “It’s disgusting. They make more money than any public service or frontline job in the UK. And again they attack, bringing chaos/financial trouble to all of London.”

  • What should commuters do?

    Commuters should always check and plan their itinerary before departing for commuting to ensure that their routes are significantly impacted.

    Check out our blog for the latest updates and news.

    You can also use the official TFL website to check for closures and suspensions.

  • Photo: RMT staff hold a picket line outside London Bridge Station.

    A 24-hour subway strike is affecting London this morning.

    Delays and cancellations are expected until 8 am on Tuesday morning.

    The image below shows RMT members on the picket line outside London Bridge Underground Station around 7 this morning.

    Transport for London has advised the public not to use the subway network today as members of the rail, sea and transport unions are on strike over a proposal to lose 600 jobs.

    Credit: LNP
  • TFL Tweet about London Underground network disruption

    Transport London tweeted: “A strike is scheduled for the subway station staff on Monday 6 June.

    “We will keep as many stations open as possible, but we expect this strike to cause serious disruption and many subway stations to close.”

  • Good for walking and biking.

    Londoners are no more than 600 meters from the Santander cycle rental point in the heart of the capital.

    Meanwhile, Brompton Bike Hire offers free bike rentals at docks across London.

    Much of Zone 1 is walkable, and people are encouraged to walk or bike whenever possible.

    A walking and biking map of the West End and City of London can be downloaded from the TfL website.

  • London Travel Advice

    Here are some tips from London Transport (TfL):

    • Please allow extra time to complete the tour.
    • As people seek alternative routes, consider walking or biking as other routes and services may be more congested.
    • Follow our safer travel guidelines during strikes.
    • Check for status updates before you travel
  • The history of the night tube

    The first 24-hour routes were the Central and Victoria routes on 19 August 2016.

    Central route service runs between Ealing Broadway and Loughton/Hainault, and the entire Victoria route continues to operate.

    Then the service started on the Northern line and the Piccadilly line joined the network.

    And in July 2017, it was announced that London Overground, also known as the Orange Line, will operate overnight Fridays and Saturdays between New Cross Gate and Dalston Junction and will expand to Highbury & Islington in 2018. .

    The Northern route runs 24 hours from Morden through Camden Town to Edgeware/High Barnet and does not run from Bank or Mill Hill East locations.

    The Piccadilly line ran between Cockfosters and Heathrow Terminal 5 and there was no service between the Terminal 4 loop or between Uxbridge and Acton Town.

  • Londoners advise against travel this morning

    London Underground warned people not to travel, warning of severe disruption across its network from service start on Monday until 8 a.m. Tuesday.

    Members of the Railway, Shipping, and Transport (RMT) union are fighting over disputes over jobs and pensions.

    Transport for London (TfL) said some train services will remain operational, but many stations, particularly those in central and south London, will be closed and others will be open for a limited time only.

  • London companies ‘disappointed’ by RMT strike

    Richard Burge, CEO of the London Chamber of Commerce, said: “We are very disappointed that RMT has called for a massive strike of TfL staff as London is so close to Queen’s Jubilee Weekend that it will be full of visitors.

    “The past two years have hit London heavily and the capital is desperately trying to get a sense of normalcy back after two turbulent years.

    “The strike puts the TfL in a position to encourage Londoners to work from home.

    “Ultimately, this will only hurt London’s economy and it’s time for the TfL to settle its dispute with RMT so we can build prosperity and show the world that London is an open business.”

  • The RMT president calls for a face-to-face meeting with the mayor.

    Secretary-General Mick Lynch said: “We are demanding a face-to-face meeting with Mayor Sadiq Khan to resolve this confusion.

    “When the power lies with the mayor, it makes no sense for our union to continue to fight with management who have neither the will nor the authority to reconcile.”

  • Why is there a strike today?

    London has a 24-hour underground commute today.

    RMT said the current proposal would cause 600 jobs to be lost, work contracts to be breached and continued threats to pensions.

  • TfL apologizes for the impact of the strike today.

    TfL’s COO Andy Lord said: “I would like to apologize to London for the impact this strike will have on travel.

    “We know it will be damaging to London and the economy at a time when public transport is playing an important role in the recovery of the capital.

    “Our focus has always been to help everyone travel around London whenever they want, but the expected impact of the RMT measures means that many stations may be closed, so we should advise people to travel only when necessary.

    “Alternatives to the subway, including bus and rail networks, are likely to be much more congested than usual, and we expect the severe disruption from this strike to continue through the morning of Tuesday, June 7th.

    “No changes to the pension have been proposed and no one will lose or lose their job as a result of the proposals we have made.

    “Working with us to find a solution is the best course of action and avoids the disruption this strike will cause to Londoners and the economy.”

  • DLR and ground services are still running.

    Transport for London (TfL) said some train services will remain operational, but many stations, particularly those in central and south London, will be closed and others will be open for a limited time only.

    Other TfL services, including DLR, London Overground and Trams, will operate unaffected by industrial action but will be busier.

    The TfL said no pensions or conditions were offered and no one would lose their jobs as a result of the proposed offer.

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