Sun. Jun 26th, 2022

VLADIMIR Putin may be preparing for war with the West if his invasion of Russia is successful.

Mikhail Khodorkovsky, once said to be Russia’s richest man, said that “domestic problems” could force Mr Putin into a military confrontation with the West.

Khodorkovsky has long-since been a vocal critic of Putin and his regime.

He’s been living in the UK since 2015 and from a career of business, he became a philanthropist.

His fortune was made through currency trading and, according to Vanity Fair, he also ran oil company, Yukos.

Speaking to Financial Times about the ongoing unrest in Ukraine, Khodorkovsky said: “If we don’t manage to deal with this plague in Ukraine, we’ll have to face it in other territories.

“For sure, Putin is going to lose eventually. If he wins now in Ukraine he will, because of domestic problems, start a war with Nato. And he will eventually lose that war.”

Read our Ukraine war live blog below for the latest news & updates…

  • Eurovision 2023 should be held in Ukraine, Boris claims

    Boris Johnson has said Ukraine should host next year’s Eurovision song competition and that he hopes it will be able to do so, regardless of the ongoing war with Russia.

    The Guardian quoted the Prime Minister speaking to reporters at RAF Brize Norton after returning from an unannounced visit to Kyiv, which is where he said he believed it should be possible for the show to go ahead there.

    “The Ukrainians won the Eurovision song contest. I know we had a fantastic entry, I know we came second and I’d love it to be in this country,” he said.

  • Explosions reported in Ukrainian city of Odesa

    The Kyiv Independent, a local English-language news source, has reported that locals heard “several explosions” in Ukraine’s southern city of Odesa.

    While these reports are yet to be confirmed by officials, explosions could mean missile attacks from Russian forces, or Ukrainian troops shooting projectiles down.

    This comes as reports emerged for three Ukrainian fatalities at an oil rig hit by Russian forces.

  • NATO pledges to deploy military to eastern Europe

    There are already 40,000 troops mobilised in response to Russia’s aggressive invasion of Ukraine.

    Germany has previously announced that it will strengthen engagement with Lithuania.

    France aims to increase its presence in Romania, where it plans to have deployed 1,000 troops by the end of 2022.

  • Russian losses as of June 20

    Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has been a costly one, leading to huge losses in both personnel and equipment.

    According to the Kyiv Independent, the country lost almost 39,000 troops, 216 planes and 1,477 tanks.

    On top of this the nation as lost 14 boats, 181 helicopters and 3588 APV.

  • Fear of Russian spies rampant in Westminster

    In a shocking revelation, The Sun Online reported that as many as four Russian spies are operating in Westminster.

    Former Russian spy Boris Karpichkov, 62, said: “I know of four sleepers of Russian security services.

    “There are several Parliament-sponsored organisations operating in Westminster directly linked to Russian security service operations.” 

    This comes after a suspected Russian operative was arrested last week, under the Official Secrets Act as he attempted to leave the UK via Gatwick Airport.

    He was taken to Hammersmith Police Station accused of spying and sabotage that is “useful to an enemy state”.

    A source told The Sun: “The suspect is believed to have been in the UK spying on behalf of the Putin regime.

    “He was kept under observation and arrested as he arrived at Gatwick to try and fly out of the country.’’

  • Ukrainian refugees could fill EU job gaps

    Reports have suggested Ukrainians entering the UK as refugees are likely to face homelessness.

    After Brexit many EU natives in the UK left.

    This left a large gap in the job market and according to Reuters, the Ukrainians may be the ones to fill it.

    However, yesterday The Independent wrote about homelessness for refugees coming to the UK.

    It’s unclear whether both are equally likely, and what this means for Ukrainians in the UK.

  • Russia continues to lose troops, equipment and weapons

    Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has been a costly one, leading to huge losses in both personnel and equipment.

    According to the Kyiv Independent, the country lost almost 39,000 troops, 216 planes and 1,477 tanks.

    On top of this the nation as lost 14 boats, 181 helicopters and 3588 APV.

  • Joe Biden unlikely to visit Ukraine, as war rages on

    The President of the United States has played down reports that he would visit Ukraine during his trip to Europe.

    When asked if he would visit the nation, as Boris did earlier this week, he noted that it would be difficult.

     “That depends.” He said.

    He went on to say he did not want to “cause more difficulty for Ukrainians”.

  • China is now Russia’s biggest oil partner

    The West have implemented a host of sanctions against Russia.

    In response to Russia‘s invasion Ukraine, the West have imposed sanctions and demanded change.

    As a result, the cost of oil in the West, including the UK is rapidly increasing.

    However, in a bid to form other alliances and maintain international power, Russia have become China’s biggest oil supplier.

    Russia have been selling discounted crude oil to Beijing causing the imports into China to total nearly 8.42m tonnes last month, according to data from the Chinese General Administration of Customs.

    Saudi Arabia is now in second place with 7.82m tonnes.

  • Russia’s blockade of Ukrainian grain is a ‘real war crime’, claims EU

    Since Russia began its invasion of Ukraine, it has been attempting to block the nation’s access to food, an unforgivable action according to EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell.

    “It is inconceivable – one cannot imagine that millions of tonnes of wheat remain blocked in Ukraine while in the rest of the world people are suffering hunger,” Mr Borrell said.

    “We call on Russia to deblockade the [Ukrainian] ports.

    “This is a real war crime, so I cannot imagine that this will last much longer.”

    The top EU official went on to say that Russia will be held accountable for these crimes should they continue.

  • Eurovision 2023 should be held in Ukraine, Boris claims

    Boris Johnson has said Ukraine should host next year’s Eurovision song competition and that he hopes it will be able to do so, regardless of the ongoing war with Russia.

    The Guardian quoted the Prime Minister speaking to reporters at RAF Brize Norton after returning from an unannounced visit to Kyiv, which is where he said he believed it should be possible for the show to go ahead there.

    “The Ukrainians won the Eurovision song contest. I know we had a fantastic entry, I know we came second and I’d love it to be in this country,” he said.

  • Explosions reported in Ukrainian city of Odesa

    The Kyiv Independent, a local English-language news source, has reported that locals heard “several explosions” in Ukraine’s southern city of Odesa.

    While these reports are yet to be confirmed by officials, explosions could mean missile attacks from Russian forces, or Ukrainian troops shooting projectiles down.

    This comes as reports emerged for three Ukrainian fatalities at an oil rig hit by Russian forces.

  • NATO pledges to deploy military to eastern Europe

    There are already 40,000 troops mobilised in response to Russia’s aggressive invasion of Ukraine.

    Germany has previously announced that it will strengthen engagement with Lithuania.

    France aims to increase its presence in Romania, where it plans to have deployed 1,000 troops by the end of 2022.

  • Russian losses as of June 20

    Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has been a costly one, leading to huge losses in both personnel and equipment.

    According to the Kyiv Independent, the country lost almost 39,000 troops, 216 planes and 1,477 tanks.

    On top of this the nation as lost 14 boats, 181 helicopters and 3588 APV.

  • Fear of Russian spies rampant in Westminster

    In a shocking revelation, The Sun Online reported that as many as four Russian spies are operating in Westminster.

    Former Russian spy Boris Karpichkov, 62, said: “I know of four sleepers of Russian security services.

    “There are several Parliament-sponsored organisations operating in Westminster directly linked to Russian security service operations.” 

    This comes after a suspected Russian operative was arrested last week, under the Official Secrets Act as he attempted to leave the UK via Gatwick Airport.

    He was taken to Hammersmith Police Station accused of spying and sabotage that is “useful to an enemy state”.

    A source told The Sun: “The suspect is believed to have been in the UK spying on behalf of the Putin regime.

    “He was kept under observation and arrested as he arrived at Gatwick to try and fly out of the country.’’

  • Russia attacks food storage in Odesa

    The Russian military has destroyed a food storage facility in southern Ukraine.

    Ukrainian officials have called this attack one made “in impotent anger at the successes of our troops”, Reuters reports.

    No civilians were harmed during these attacks, according to reports.

  • Kyiv Mayor claims peace talks can’t begin until Russia leaves Ukraine

    Vitali Klitschko, the Mayor of Kyiv, has said his country will only enter peace talks after the “last Russian soldier has left Ukraine”.

    Some Ukrainian officials have expressed private concerns that Western allies may push their country towards a peace deal with Russia.

    Speaking to the BBC, Mayor Klitschko was asked if he was concerned Ukraine could be pressured to making concessions to the Russians.

    He replied: “The Russians talked about ‘Let’s find a compromise. Let’s find a solution’. What are they talking about? Which compromise? To give parts of Ukrainian territory to the Russians is not a compromise.

    “I’m more than sure we will be ready to talk with the Russians about some compromise. If the last Russian soldier left Ukraine, it will be time to talk but not yet. Russians have to go from our homeland.”

  • Canada donates $733m to Ukraine war effort

    $773m has been loaned to Ukraine from Canada, its finance ministry confirmed in a statement on Friday.

    “The funds will be directed to the state budget to finance priority expenditures, in particular, to ensure priority social and humanitarian expenditures,” the ministry said.

    Al-Jazeera reports that Ukrainian Minister of Finance Sergii Marchenko said he was grateful to the government of Canada “for the unwavering support for Ukraine in the fight for our freedom”.

  • Russia’s blockade of Ukrainian grain is a ‘real war crime’, claims EU

    Since Russia began its invasion of Ukraine, it has been attempting to block the nation’s access to food, an unforgivable action according to EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell.

    “It is inconceivable – one cannot imagine that millions of tonnes of wheat remain blocked in Ukraine while in the rest of the world people are suffering hunger,” Mr Borrell said.

    “We call on Russia to deblockade the [Ukrainian] ports.

    “This is a real war crime, so I cannot imagine that this will last much longer.”

    The top EU official went on to say that Russia will be held accountable for these crimes should they continue.

  • Death toll rises after Russian oil rig attack

    Following the bombing of Ukraine’s Dnipropetrovsk Oblast oil rig, three more have been reported dead.

    The attack, that took place on June 18, has led to 13 more being reported injured.

    The bombing led to fires across the area.

  • German Chancellor pleads with Russia to ease global food shortage

    Olaf Scholz, the German Chancellor, has called un Russia to ease their blockade of Ukrainian ports and help ease the global food crisis.

    “You have to hope for the world’s sake that an agreement is reached,” Scholz told the dpa news agency, referring to continuing negotiations about establishing an export corridor across the Black Sea.

    “Russia must enable safe passage and at the same time give credible assurances that it will not use the corridor for an invasion,” he told dpa.

  • Explosions reported on Ukrainian city of Odesa

    The Kyiv Independent, a local English-language news source, has reported that locals heard “several explosions” in Ukraine’s southern city of Odesa.

    While these reports are yet to be confirmed by officials, explosions could mean missile attacks from Russian forces, or Ukrainian troops shooting projectiles down.

    This comes as reports emerged for three Ukrainian fatalities at an oil rig hit by Russian forces.

  • Ukraine will ‘definitely win’, says Zelenskiy

    The Ukrainian gave a rousing speech to Ukrainian troops yesterday, as he handed out medals and other honours.

    “Our brave men. Each one of them is working flat out,” he said. “We will definitely hold out. We will definitely win.”

    This speech was shared via video on his official Telegram account.

  • Russian tennis player changes nationality

    Wimbledon have imposed a ban on all Russian players.

    In light of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Wimbledon officials have imposed a ban on all Russian tennis players this year.

    This has led to a range of responses, but some are taking drastic action.

    Russian-born tennis player Natela Dzalamidze has changed her nationality in order to avoid the ban.

    Dzalamidze is now Georgian rather than Russian. The doubles professional is ranked 43 in the world according to WTA.

    She will now be able to compete in this year’s tournament with her Serbian partner, Aleksandra Krunić when Wimbledon gets underway on June 27.

  • Ukrainian refugees could fill EU job gaps

    Reports have suggested Ukrainians entering the UK as refugees are likely to face homelessness.

    After Brexit many EU natives in the UK left.

    This left a large gap in the job market and according to Reuters, the Ukrainians may be the ones to fill it.

    However, yesterday The Independent wrote about homelessness for refugees coming to the UK.

    It’s unclear whether both are equally likely, and what this means for Ukrainians in the UK.

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